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The Economist

Dec 17 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

The winter war • Ukraine’s chiefs warn of a looming Russian offensive and the critical months that lie ahead

Little steps, many lives • What the state can still do to avoid an enormous death toll

Sapped of vitality • Why are the rich world’s politicians giving up on economic growth?

The French exception • As the world turns back to nuclear power, it should heed the lessons from France

How to save the Rainbow Nation • The ruling party is unreformable. The country needs a coalition of the clean

Letters

A fateful winter • KYIVWe interview Volodymyr Zelensky and his top generals about the war’s crucial next phase

Restraint under fire • KYIVUkraine’s top soldier runs a different kind of army from Russia’s

Picket lines and poké • CHICAGO AND LOS ANGELESUnions are gentrifying. Can that reverse their decline?

Mr Musk’s moderation • Twitter’s internal communications are damning, but no anti-woke slam-dunk

Crimes of fashion • DALLAS AND SAN FRANCISCOWhy thefts of a once-obscure car part have soared

Chop chop • APPLETON, WISCONSINAxe-throwing may be the friendliest new sport in America

Or else • BALTIMOREA city experiments with paying people to stop being annoying

Smoke and mirrors • WASHINGTON, DCThe possible unintended consequences of anti-vaping policies

The hunted • Republicans should leave Hunter Biden to his painting, and the Justice Department

The agony of Peronism • BUENOS AIRESA once-dominant populist movement is at its lowest ebb

East Asia’s big beasts don’t get on • TOKYO AND WASHINGTON, DCSeparating security and commerce is becoming harder for Japan and China

Dying tongues • YONAGUNIOkinawa’s endangered languages are victims of history

BTS takes on Kim Jong Un • SEOULMilitary service may be a bit duller than stardom for Jin

At the coal face • BEIJINGCitizens brave the cold to scold the ruling classes

Brawling on the roof of the world • China’s frontier aggression is pushing India towards the West

On their own • BEIJINGThe government has left the public to fend for itself against covid-19

No worse than the flu? • What to make of the claim that this version of covid-19 isn’t so bad

Lives on the lines • Our model shows that the death toll from covid in China could be massive

Xi Jinping’s covid retreat • The Communist Party prepares to spin its way out of a rout

A bitter life for all • DURBAN AND JOHANNESBURGThe ANC is self-destructing. The collateral damage is destroying South Africa

Trouble down at the kraal • KOTIDOCommercial cattle-raiding enriches some but can starve others

Big brother will see you now • BULAWAYO AND HARAREChina is helping Zimbabwe build a surveillance state

The elusive looters • A new prime minister vows to clean up the country. Few think he will succeed

Of lions and pride • DUBAIMorocco’s unlikely World Cup success sparks a debate about Arab identity

Survival of the blitzed • KYIVDespite power cuts and blockades, Ukraine’s economy is coping

Missing multitudes • KYIVEven before the war, Ukraine was one of the fastest-shrinking countries

Unbeloved Berlin • BERLINGermany’s capital struggles to clean up its act

The job-share taoiseachs • DUBLINLeo Varadkar returns as leader

Two-speed nation • USSELFrance wants more...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

The winter war • Ukraine’s chiefs warn of a looming Russian offensive and the critical months that lie ahead

Little steps, many lives • What the state can still do to avoid an enormous death toll

Sapped of vitality • Why are the rich world’s politicians giving up on economic growth?

The French exception • As the world turns back to nuclear power, it should heed the lessons from France

How to save the Rainbow Nation • The ruling party is unreformable. The country needs a coalition of the clean

Letters

A fateful winter • KYIVWe interview Volodymyr Zelensky and his top generals about the war’s crucial next phase

Restraint under fire • KYIVUkraine’s top soldier runs a different kind of army from Russia’s

Picket lines and poké • CHICAGO AND LOS ANGELESUnions are gentrifying. Can that reverse their decline?

Mr Musk’s moderation • Twitter’s internal communications are damning, but no anti-woke slam-dunk

Crimes of fashion • DALLAS AND SAN FRANCISCOWhy thefts of a once-obscure car part have soared

Chop chop • APPLETON, WISCONSINAxe-throwing may be the friendliest new sport in America

Or else • BALTIMOREA city experiments with paying people to stop being annoying

Smoke and mirrors • WASHINGTON, DCThe possible unintended consequences of anti-vaping policies

The hunted • Republicans should leave Hunter Biden to his painting, and the Justice Department

The agony of Peronism • BUENOS AIRESA once-dominant populist movement is at its lowest ebb

East Asia’s big beasts don’t get on • TOKYO AND WASHINGTON, DCSeparating security and commerce is becoming harder for Japan and China

Dying tongues • YONAGUNIOkinawa’s endangered languages are victims of history

BTS takes on Kim Jong Un • SEOULMilitary service may be a bit duller than stardom for Jin

At the coal face • BEIJINGCitizens brave the cold to scold the ruling classes

Brawling on the roof of the world • China’s frontier aggression is pushing India towards the West

On their own • BEIJINGThe government has left the public to fend for itself against covid-19

No worse than the flu? • What to make of the claim that this version of covid-19 isn’t so bad

Lives on the lines • Our model shows that the death toll from covid in China could be massive

Xi Jinping’s covid retreat • The Communist Party prepares to spin its way out of a rout

A bitter life for all • DURBAN AND JOHANNESBURGThe ANC is self-destructing. The collateral damage is destroying South Africa

Trouble down at the kraal • KOTIDOCommercial cattle-raiding enriches some but can starve others

Big brother will see you now • BULAWAYO AND HARAREChina is helping Zimbabwe build a surveillance state

The elusive looters • A new prime minister vows to clean up the country. Few think he will succeed

Of lions and pride • DUBAIMorocco’s unlikely World Cup success sparks a debate about Arab identity

Survival of the blitzed • KYIVDespite power cuts and blockades, Ukraine’s economy is coping

Missing multitudes • KYIVEven before the war, Ukraine was one of the fastest-shrinking countries

Unbeloved Berlin • BERLINGermany’s capital struggles to clean up its act

The job-share taoiseachs • DUBLINLeo Varadkar returns as leader

Two-speed nation • USSELFrance wants more...


Expand title description text